wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (romanesque)

Come, come, O Rising Sun, comfort us with your coming. Dispel the shadows of night and the fearful darkness of night.

from 'Veni, veni Emmanuel' (Cologne, 1710)

Belated greetings to my friends online.

Click on the image to see a larger version.

wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (romanesque)
The Second Coming

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)
Happy New Year!

Yesterday the writings and visual art works of creators who died in the course of 1945 came out of copyright in Britain and the other EC countries. (This does not apply to any of their works that were first published posthumously, nor to translations that were published more recently, or were made by translators who are still alive, or who died less than 70 years ago.)

For several years I have marked the New Year by posting details of some of the authors whose works are coming out of copyright. This year I plan to make two such posts, one today, and another in a day or so.

In this post I shall focus on three British authors of speculative fiction: David Lindsay (b. 1876), E.R. Eddison (b. 1882) and Charles Williams (b. 1886).

Williams, who worked for Oxford University Press, was a close friend of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien and a core member of the informal reading and discussion group known as the Inklings. Eddison was an occasional visitor at meetings of the group. Lewis and Tolkien admired his books. They also greatly admired David Lindsay's science fiction novel A Voyage to Arcturus (1920).

More )

wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (romanesque)
Happy New Year!

Yesterday the writings and visual art works of creators who died in the course of 1945 came out of copyright in Britain and the other EC countries. (This does not apply to any of their works that were first published posthumously, nor to translations that were published more recently, or were made by translators who are still alive, or who died less than 70 years ago.)

For several years I have marked the New Year by posting details of some of the authors whose works are coming out of copyright. This year I plan to make two such posts, one today, and another in a day or so.

In this post I shall focus on three British authors of speculative fiction: David Lindsay (b. 1876), E.R. Eddison (b. 1882) and Charles Williams (b. 1886).

Williams, who worked for Oxford University Press, was a close friend of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien and a core member of the informal reading and discussion group known as the Inklings. Eddison was an occasional visitor at meetings of the group. Lewis and Tolkien admired his books. They also greatly admired David Lindsay's science fiction novel A Voyage to Arcturus (1920).

More )

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The following verses, a parody of a popular song, were published in the Examiner, the radical journal founded by Leigh Hunt, on 7 August 1841. The Conservatives had won a huge election victory in July.

The Fine Old English Gentleman

New Version

(To be said or sung at all Conservative Dinners.)

I'll sing you a new ballad, and I'll warrant it first-rate,
Of the days of that old gentleman who had that old estate;
When they spent the public money at a bountiful old rate
On ev'ry mistress, pimp, and scamp, at ev'ry noble gate,
In the fine old English Tory times;
Soon may they come again!

The good old laws were garnished well with gibbets, whips, and chains,
With fine old English penalties, and fine old English pains,
With rebel heads, and seas of blood once hot in rebel veins;
For all these things were requisite to guard the rich old gains
Of the fine old English Tory times;
Soon may they come again!

This brave old code, like Argus, had a hundred watchful eyes,
And ev'ry English peasant had his good old English spies,
To tempt his starving discontent with fine old English lies,
Then call the good old Yeomanry to stop his peevish cries,
In the fine old English Tory times;
Soon may they come again!

More verses )

The bright old day now dawns again; the cry runs through the land,
In England there shall be dear bread—in Ireland, sword and brand;
And poverty, and ignorance, shall swell the rich and grand—
So, rally round the rulers with the gentle iron hand,
Of the fine old English Tory days;
Hail to the coming time!


Charles Dickens (1812–1870)
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

Happy New Year!

Yesterday the writings and visual art works of creators who died in the course of 1944 came out of copyright in Britain and the other EC countries. (This does not apply to any of their works that were first published posthumously, nor to translations that were published more recently, or were made by translators who are still alive, or who died less than 70 years ago.)

Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch (b. 1863) was King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at Cambridge. He was a prolific author of fiction, poetry and literary criticism; he also compiled a number of anthologies. His Oxford Book of English Verse and Oxford Book of Ballads were both in the library of my grammar school in the sixties, and I devoured them like I devoured every other volume of poetry I laid hands on. From a scholarly point of view his Oxford Book of Ballads is deplorable; he did not hesitate to 'improve' texts, to merge different versions of the same ballad, and even to bowdlerize them. But I owe him a debt, nonetheless, for making such a substantial selection of ballads available and accessible. I read the book from end to end, over and over again.

More )
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (romanesque)

Happy New Year!

Yesterday the writings and visual art works of creators who died in the course of 1944 came out of copyright in Britain and the other EC countries. (This does not apply to any of their works that were first published posthumously, nor to translations that were published more recently, or were made by translators who are still alive, or who died less than 70 years ago.)

Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch (b. 1863) was King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at Cambridge. He was a prolific author of fiction, poetry and literary criticism; he also compiled a number of anthologies. His Oxford Book of English Verse and Oxford Book of Ballads were both in the library of my grammar school in the sixties, and I devoured them like I devoured every other volume of poetry I laid hands on. From a scholarly point of view his Oxford Book of Ballads is deplorable; he did not hesitate to 'improve' texts, to merge different versions of the same ballad, and even to bowdlerize them. But I owe him a debt, nonetheless, for making such a substantial selection of ballads available and accessible. I read the book from end to end, over and over again.

More )
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

Greetings of the season to my friends online.




O rising sun, splendour of light, come and shed your radiance on those who wait in darkness.

from an antiphon for Advent, sixth century AD


Click on the image to see a larger version.

wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

Greetings of the season to my friends online.




O rising sun, splendour of light, come and shed your radiance on those who wait in darkness.

from an antiphon for Advent, sixth century AD


Click on the image to see a larger version.
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

Attack of the week: POODLE:
Believe it or not, there's a new attack on SSL. …

The attack is called POODLE …

The rough summary of POODLE is this: it allows a clever attacker who can (a) control the Internet connection between your browser and the server, and (b) run some code (e.g., script) in your browser to potentially decrypt authentication cookies for sites such as Google, Yahoo and your bank. This is obviously not a good thing, and unfortunately the attack is more practical than you might think. You should probably disable SSLv3 everywhere you can. – Matthew Green, cryptographic engineer

Unfortunately, some sites, including a few banking sites, still do not support TLS. There is a list of such sites here: https://zmap.io/sslv3/ [Scroll down to the section 'Alexa HTTPS Sites Without TLS Support'.] If you use Firefox, you can install an addon which would disable SSL 3.0 but allow you to change the setting from a menu to access a particular site. See below, under Firefox.

Internet Explorer

To disable SSLv3 in Internet Explorer, versions 7--11, you can follow this procedure:

1. Click on the Tools menu and select Internet Options. (If the tools menu isn't visible, press ALT+ T in Internet Explorer 8 and ALT+ X in Internet Explorer 9--11.)

2. Select the Advanced tab.

3. Scroll down to foot.

4. Uncheck Use SSL 3.0.

5. Make sure Use TLS 1.0 is checked, and any other Use TLS setting as well (if there are others).

6. Click on OK.

If you are still using IE 6 you have a problem, since IE 6 can't use TLS. (But who is still using IE 6?)

Firefox

To disable SSLv3 in Firefox you can install the addon on this page: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/ssl-version-control/

This will disable SSL 3.0 but allow you to change the setting from a menu if you find you need to use a site that lacks TLS support.

If for any reason you don't wish to install the addon you can follow this procedure:

1. Type about:config in the URL bar.

2. Disregard the warning.

3. Type security.tls.version.min in the search box. The settings for this preference will immediately appear at the top of the window below.

4. If Value = 0 double-click on the 0, type 1 into the box that appears, and click OK.

5. Close tab.

Chrome

This page has a section on how to fix Chrome and related browsers: https://www.winhelp.us/news/144/207/How-to-protect-browsers-from-SSL-3-POODLE-attacks.html [Scroll down to 'How to disable SSL 3 in Google Chrome and other Chromium-based browsers']

Apple

Apple have issued an update that is supposed to fix OS X (Mavericks and Mountain Lion only): http://www.computerworld.com/article/2835654/apple-patches-os-x-to-protect-against-poodle.html [Scroll down to end of article for information on how to install it.]

No fix for IOS yet.
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

Contemplating the dragon harpist, I asked 'What songs do dragons sing?' [livejournal.com profile] papersky, wise in the ways of dragons, knows the answer.

wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)
Contemplating the dragon harpist, I asked 'What songs do dragons sing?' [identity profile] papersky.livejournal.com, wise in the ways of dragons, knows the answer.
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)
Dragon playing the harp


This is a fifteenth-century roof boss in the cloisters at Lacock Abbey. By the looks of it the dragon is singing as well as playing a seven-string harp. What songs do dragons sing? Fierce, wild songs, I imagine. There are sharp teeth in those jaws. This is not a tame creature.

The carvings at Lacock include two mermaids, a manticore, Reynard the Fox making off with a goose, and a bowman who is possibly meant for Robin Hood. I have put all my photos of the Lacock roof bosses in a Flickr set.
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)
Dragon playing the harp


This is a fifteenth-century roof boss in the cloisters at Lacock Abbey. By the looks of it the dragon is singing as well as playing a seven-string harp. What songs do dragons sing? Fierce, wild songs, I imagine. There are sharp teeth in those jaws. This is not a tame creature.

The carvings at Lacock include two mermaids, a manticore, Reynard the Fox making off with a goose, and a bowman who is possibly meant for Robin Hood. I have put all my photos of the Lacock roof bosses in a Flickr set.
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)
Festival

[1915]

To André Rouveyre*

Fireworks in steel
How bewitching this illumination is
  A firework-maker's art
To mix with bravery a little grace

Two star-shells
A burst of rose
Like two breasts just unlaced
Stretch their tips out saucily
HE KNEW HOW TO LOVE
                           what an epitaph

A poet in the forest
Gazes with indifference
   His revolver set to safety
On the roses dying of hope

He dreams of the roses of Saadi**
And suddenly his head drops
Because a rose repeats to him
The soft curve of a hip

The air is full of horrible alcohol
Filtered from half-closed stars
The shells caress the soft
Perfume of night where you are resting
     Mortification of the roses

*Writer and artist; friend of Apollinaire

**Mosleh al-Din Saadi Shirazi; Persian poet; fl. mid-thirteenth century. Author of The Rose Garden

Guillaume Apollinaire (1880–1918)

translation © Gillian Spraggs 2014

Original French )
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)
Festival

[1915]

To André Rouveyre*

Fireworks in steel
How bewitching this illumination is
  A firework-maker's art
To mix with bravery a little grace

Two star-shells
A burst of rose
Like two breasts just unlaced
Stretch their tips out saucily
HE KNEW HOW TO LOVE
                           what an epitaph

A poet in the forest
Gazes with indifference
   His revolver set to safety
On the roses dying of hope

He dreams of the roses of Saadi**
And suddenly his head drops
Because a rose repeats to him
The soft curve of a hip

The air is full of horrible alcohol
Filtered from half-closed stars
The shells caress the soft
Perfume of night where you are resting
     Mortification of the roses

*Writer and artist; friend of Apollinaire

**Mosleh al-Din Saadi Shirazi; Persian poet; fl. mid-thirteenth century. Author of The Rose Garden

Guillaume Apollinaire (1880–1918)

translation © Gillian Spraggs 2014

Original French )
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

If you are an author, agent or publisher and you already know plenty about ECL, you may wish to skip straight to the survey. Otherwise read on:

Extended collective licensing (ECL) is a form of collective licensing of copyright works under which collecting societies are legally permitted to license the use of works created by (or belonging to) persons who are not members of their society. Last summer the UK Parliament passed primary legislation to legalise extended collective licensing by UK collecting societies. Secondary legislation is expected this autumn: this will set out in detail the regulations under which such schemes will operate.

The libraries and archives sector (or at least, the big, well-funded libraries and archives) want an ECL scheme or schemes that will permit them to digitise printed books and other materials and make them available online. The Government has announced its intention that ECL should be available for mass digitisation projects. Rumours reach me that the Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA) and the Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS) are preparing to move ahead with licensing such projects as soon as the law allows.

These projects will sweep up the works of foreign as well as British authors, illustrators, photographers, etc.

[More at Action on Authors' Rights]
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

If you are an author, agent or publisher and you already know plenty about ECL, you may wish to skip straight to the survey. Otherwise read on:

Extended collective licensing (ECL) is a form of collective licensing of copyright works under which collecting societies are legally permitted to license the use of works created by (or belonging to) persons who are not members of their society. Last summer the UK Parliament passed primary legislation to legalise extended collective licensing by UK collecting societies. Secondary legislation is expected this autumn: this will set out in detail the regulations under which such schemes will operate.

The libraries and archives sector (or at least, the big, well-funded libraries and archives) want an ECL scheme or schemes that will permit them to digitise printed books and other materials and make them available online. The Government has announced its intention that ECL should be available for mass digitisation projects. Rumours reach me that the Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA) and the Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS) are preparing to move ahead with licensing such projects as soon as the law allows.

These projects will sweep up the works of foreign as well as British authors, illustrators, photographers, etc.

[More at Action on Authors' Rights]
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

When I was about five years old my father happened to be in a basement-chamber of our house, where they had been washing, and where a good fire of oak-logs was still burning; he had a viol in his hand, and was playing and singing alone beside the fire. The weather was very cold. Happening to look into the fire, he spied in the middle of those most burning flames a little creature like a lizard, which was sporting in the core of the intensest coals. Becoming instantly aware of what the thing was, he had my sister and me called, and pointing it out to us children, gave me a great box on the ears, which caused me to howl and weep with all my might. Then he pacified me good-humouredly, and spoke as follows: “My dear little boy, I am not striking you for any wrong that you have done, but only to make you remember that that lizard which you see in the fire is a salamander, a creature which has never been seen before by any one of whom we have credible information.” So saying he kissed me and gave me some pieces of money.

Benvenuto Cellini (1500–1571) in La Vita di Benvenuto Cellini scritta da lui medesimo (begun 1558)

translated by John Addington Symonds (1840–1893)
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

When I was about five years old my father happened to be in a basement-chamber of our house, where they had been washing, and where a good fire of oak-logs was still burning; he had a viol in his hand, and was playing and singing alone beside the fire. The weather was very cold. Happening to look into the fire, he spied in the middle of those most burning flames a little creature like a lizard, which was sporting in the core of the intensest coals. Becoming instantly aware of what the thing was, he had my sister and me called, and pointing it out to us children, gave me a great box on the ears, which caused me to howl and weep with all my might. Then he pacified me good-humouredly, and spoke as follows: “My dear little boy, I am not striking you for any wrong that you have done, but only to make you remember that that lizard which you see in the fire is a salamander, a creature which has never been seen before by any one of whom we have credible information.” So saying he kissed me and gave me some pieces of money.

Benvenuto Cellini (1500–1571) in La Vita di Benvenuto Cellini scritta da lui medesimo (begun 1558)

translated by John Addington Symonds (1840–1893)
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

Happy New Year!

Today the writings and visual art works of creators who died in the course of 1943 come out of copyright in Britain and the other EC countries. (This does not apply to any of their works that were first published posthumously, nor to translations that were published more recently, or were made by translators who are still alive, or who died less than 70 years ago.)

I have a brief but vivid memory of visiting the public library with my mother when I was four. I am running to find my mother, full of excitement, holding out a little squarish book that I know, from the pictures (I do not know how to read yet), is about the adventures of two mice. My mother is browsing the shelves in an alcove nearby; she is outlined against a big window glazed with frosted glass, through which the winter afternoon sunlight slants in a blaze of deep gold.
More )
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (romanesque)

Happy New Year!

Today the writings and visual art works of creators who died in the course of 1943 come out of copyright in Britain and the other EC countries. (This does not apply to any of their works that were first published posthumously, nor to translations that were published more recently, or were made by translators who are still alive, or who died less than 70 years ago.)

I have a brief but vivid memory of visiting the public library with my mother when I was four. I am running to find my mother, full of excitement, holding out a little squarish book that I know, from the pictures (I do not know how to read yet), is about the adventures of two mice. My mother is browsing the shelves in an alcove nearby; she is outlined against a big window glazed with frosted glass, through which the winter afternoon sunlight slants in a blaze of deep gold.

More )
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The British Library (BL) is working on a project to digitise Spare Rib, the landmark UK feminist magazine of the seventies and eighties. The Library wants to make the digitised issues available on the web. For this it will need the permission of the several thousand contributors who provided the magazine with its material. Some of the contributors have already received a letter about the project, and there was an item in the Guardian last Saturday.

I contributed to Spare Rib myself, back in the day, and so did a number of people I know, so when a friend forwarded me the letter with attached information sheet that is being sent out to contributors I read it with very great interest. And increasing alarm. And my alarm grew the more thoroughly I investigated the way in which the scheme is being conducted.

[More at Action on Authors' Rights]

See also Calling all Spare Rib veterans - the Register.
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (romanesque)
The British Library (BL) is working on a project to digitise Spare Rib, the landmark UK feminist magazine of the seventies and eighties. The Library wants to make the digitised issues available on the web. For this it will need the permission of the several thousand contributors who provided the magazine with its material. Some of the contributors have already received a letter about the project, and there was an item in the Guardian last Saturday.

I contributed to Spare Rib myself, back in the day, and so did a number of people I know, so when a friend forwarded me the letter with attached information sheet that is being sent out to contributors I read it with very great interest. And increasing alarm. And my alarm grew the more thoroughly I investigated the way in which the scheme is being conducted.

[More at Action on Authors' Rights]

See also Calling all Spare Rib veterans - the Register.
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

In the palace of the Emperor Ming Hwang, the walls were of great size, and upon one of these the Emperor ordered Wu Tao-tzu to paint a landscape. The artist prepared his materials, and concealing the wall with curtains commenced his work. After a little while he drew aside the veil, and there lay a glorious scene, with mountains, forests, clouds, men, birds, and all things as in nature. While the Emperor gazed on it with admiration, Wu Tao-tzu, pointing to a certain part of the picture, said, “Behold this temple grotto at the foot of the mountain — within it dwells a spirit.” He clapped his hands and the gate of the cave suddenly opened. “The interior is beautiful beyond conception,” continued the artist. “Permit me to show the way, that Your Imperial Majesty may behold the marvels it contains.” He passed within and turned round, beckoning his patron to follow, but in a moment the gateway closed, and before the amazed ruler could advance a step, the whole scene faded away, leaving the wall white as before the contact of the painter’s brush. And Wu Tao-tzu was never seen again.

Slightly adapted from the version quoted by Herbert A. Giles in An Introduction to the History of Chinese Pictorial Art from Pictorial Arts of Japan by William Anderson (1842–1900)

Wu Tao-Tzu flourished c. 720–c. 760
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

In the palace of the Emperor Ming Hwang, the walls were of great size, and upon one of these the Emperor ordered Wu Tao-tzu to paint a landscape. The artist prepared his materials, and concealing the wall with curtains commenced his work. After a little while he drew aside the veil, and there lay a glorious scene, with mountains, forests, clouds, men, birds, and all things as in nature. While the Emperor gazed on it with admiration, Wu Tao-tzu, pointing to a certain part of the picture, said, “Behold this temple grotto at the foot of the mountain — within it dwells a spirit.” He clapped his hands and the gate of the cave suddenly opened. “The interior is beautiful beyond conception,” continued the artist. “Permit me to show the way, that Your Imperial Majesty may behold the marvels it contains.” He passed within and turned round, beckoning his patron to follow, but in a moment the gateway closed, and before the amazed ruler could advance a step, the whole scene faded away, leaving the wall white as before the contact of the painter’s brush. And Wu Tao-tzu was never seen again.

Slightly adapted from the version quoted by Herbert A. Giles in An Introduction to the History of Chinese Pictorial Art from Pictorial Arts of Japan by William Anderson (1842–1900)

Wu Tao-Tzu flourished c. 720–c. 760
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On Thursday 2 May the UK Independence Party (UKIP), led by Nigel Farage, gained 23% of the national vote and more than 130 seats in the local elections in England [Guardian]

After many of the results had come through, David Cameron withdrew a claim, made in 2006, that UKIP are 'fruitcakes', saying: Look, it's not good insulting a political party that people have chosen to vote for. ... we need to show respect for people who've taken the choice to support this party.' [Guardian 2013; Guardian 2006]

Cameron's change of tone is almost explicitly tactical. It certainly isn't logical. Nothing about UKIP has changed recently, except the extent of their electoral success. If they were fruitcakes in 2006, then fruitcakes they still are. I myself think 'fruitcake' is a rather inappropriate tag for them. It almost makes them sound cuddly. They are not.
Some landmarks in the history of UKIP

1991 Alan Sked, a historian at the London School of Economics, formed the Anti-Federalist League, a group opposed to the Treaty of Maastricht, which established the European Union.

1993 Sked and others founded the UK Independence Party. The party's primary aim was to take Britain out of the EU. [Guardian]

1997 Sked resigned from UKIP. In 2010 he said, in a letter to the Times: 'I founded UKIP as a tolerant, liberal and democratic party. By 1997 I could already see the far-right writing on the wall and quit as party leader and member. It is a decision that I have never regretted...' [Junius on UKIP blog]

1999 Three UKIP MEPs were elected, including Nigel Farage, a City commodities broker.

Soon afterwards, a photograph was published showing Farage talking to two members of the British National Party (BNP): Mark Deavin, author of a paper that argues that what he calls "the mass immigration of non-Europeans into every White country on earth" was the result of an international Jewish conspiracy, and Tony Lecomber, jailed for three years in 1986 for possessing explosives, and again in 1991 for stabbing a Jewish schoolteacher. Farage admitted having lunch with Deakin, but had 'no recollection' of meeting Lecomber. The photograph was taken in the summer of 1997. A Guardian report stated that 'Farage ... is a man who often used words such as "nigger" and "nig-nog" in the pub after committee meetings.' [Guardian]

2004 UKIP took third place in the EU elections, with 12 MEPs elected. [Guardian]

New UKIP MEP Godfrey Bloom quickly achieved a kind of fame when he put himself up for a seat on the parliament's committee for women's rights and promptly announced: "I am going to promote men's rights." He stated: "I want to deal with women's issues, because I just don't think they clean behind the fridge enough," explaining, "I am here to represent Yorkshire women, who always have dinner on the table when you get home." Then he clarified his views on local television: "The more women's rights you have, it's actually a bar to their employment .... No self-respecting small businessman with a brain in the right place would ever employ a lady of child-bearing age." [Guardian]
Cut for length )
wolfinthewood: Wolf's head in relief from romanesque tympanum at Kilpeck, Herefordshire (Default)

On Thursday 2 May the UK Independence Party (UKIP), led by Nigel Farage, gained 23% of the national vote and more than 130 seats in the local elections in England [Guardian]

After many of the results had come through, David Cameron withdrew a claim, made in 2006, that UKIP are 'fruitcakes', saying: Look, it's not good insulting a political party that people have chosen to vote for. ... we need to show respect for people who've taken the choice to support this party.' [Guardian 2013; Guardian 2006]

Cameron's change of tone is almost explicitly tactical. It certainly isn't logical. Nothing about UKIP has changed recently, except the extent of their electoral success. If they were fruitcakes in 2006, then fruitcakes they still are. I myself think 'fruitcake' is a rather inappropriate tag for them. It almost makes them sound cuddly. They are not.
Some landmarks in the history of UKIP

1991 Alan Sked, a historian at the London School of Economics, formed the Anti-Federalist League, a group opposed to the Treaty of Maastricht, which established the European Union.

1993 Sked and others founded the UK Independence Party. The party's primary aim was to take Britain out of the EU. [Guardian]

1997 Sked resigned from UKIP. In 2010 he said, in a letter to the Times: 'I founded UKIP as a tolerant, liberal and democratic party. By 1997 I could already see the far-right writing on the wall and quit as party leader and member. It is a decision that I have never regretted...' [Junius on UKIP blog]

1999 Three UKIP MEPs were elected, including Nigel Farage, a City commodities broker.

Soon afterwards, a photograph was published showing Farage talking to two members of the British National Party (BNP): Mark Deavin, author of a paper that argues that what he calls "the mass immigration of non-Europeans into every White country on earth" was the result of an international Jewish conspiracy, and Tony Lecomber, jailed for three years in 1986 for possessing explosives, and again in 1991 for stabbing a Jewish schoolteacher. Farage admitted having lunch with Deakin, but had 'no recollection' of meeting Lecomber. The photograph was taken in the summer of 1997. A Guardian report stated that 'Farage ... is a man who often used words such as "nigger" and "nig-nog" in the pub after committee meetings.' [Guardian]

2004 UKIP took third place in the EU elections, with 12 MEPs elected. [Guardian]

New UKIP MEP Godfrey Bloom quickly achieved a kind of fame when he put himself up for a seat on the parliament's committee for women's rights and promptly announced: "I am going to promote men's rights." He stated: "I want to deal with women's issues, because I just don't think they clean behind the fridge enough," explaining, "I am here to represent Yorkshire women, who always have dinner on the table when you get home." Then he clarified his views on local television: "The more women's rights you have, it's actually a bar to their employment .... No self-respecting small businessman with a brain in the right place would ever employ a lady of child-bearing age." [Guardian]
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